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Thursday, May 13, 2010

Good "Taste"













Caramel Pecan Cheesecake from The Diet Rebel's Cookbook: Eating Clean and Green by Jillayne Clements and Michelle Stewart

One of the things I enjoy doing in life is creating yummy whole food recipes. Of course, my favorite recipes to make are healthy desserts. When I say healthy desserts, sometimes people look at me funny because to them, "healthy" means low fat, aspartame sweetened food that's supposed to resemble the desserts they're used to.

But when I say healthy, I mean food that's nutrient dense because it's made with whole food ingredients--such as natural sugars with all their micronutrients intact (including those that help with blood sugar stabilization), whole grains that have been prepared in a way to increase vitamin content and create vitamin C (something that regular whole grain doesn't have, and something that refined grain flour definitely doesn't have), and fat from the right sources (because fat is essential for healthy brains and warmth and fat soluble vitamin absorption, and also helps to slow the absorption of sugar into the blood stream, so in essence, "low fat" or "fat free" does not equal healthy.)

What is the result of eating desserts and other food made from whole food ingredients vs. food from refined? For starters, your body is being nourished and satisfied on less. Desserts made this way tend to have a lighter flavor, and they are not as addicting because they are gentler on the blood sugar levels. Refined foods can be addicting because even though the fullness is there, a lot of the nutrients (the real reason why we eat in the first place) are missing. This creates cravings and a desire to get those nutrients through other sources, even though we know we shouldn't be hungry.

I have heard many people say that they "feel good" after eating my dessert creations, and not in the I-just-ate-a-bunch-of-sugar-so-now-I-feel-like-giggling-until-the-high-wears-off-and-then-I-become-grouchy way. They mean it in the that-was-Divine-tasting-and-yet-I-feel-satisfied-and-nourished kind of a way.

It is possible to nourish and build up the body while at the same time keeping the taste buds happy.

The reason I mention all this is because I believe this ties into books as well. There have been books I have read over the years that were highly entertaining (delicious) and yet when I was done, I was left feeling empty or down. On the other hand, there have been books I have read that have left me with a feeling of satisfaction, edification, or a desire to live my life better. With all the junk in the entertainment field, I'm so thankful for publishers such as Cedar Fort who believe that books should not only be of good "taste" but that they edify and uplift as well.

This is what I strive for as an author and as a preparer of whole foods, and it is how I strive to live as a human being. I have created a "blogsite" my blog that's set up like a website with different "pages" that incorporates this message. The content throughout the pages--which include writing tips, cooking tip/recipes, and wellness--is designed to uplift and encourage or nourish. Please feel free to visit and give feedback. www.jillayneclements.blogspot.com

3 comments:

Anne Bradshaw said...

Oh, this all sounds SO good, Jillayne. I'm with you 100%. My kind of book for sure.

Heather Justesen said...

That looks fabulous, and I'd love to use better ingredients (I mostly scratch cook anyway, so I might as well use the right ingredients, right?) I'm definitely picking up your book!

Jillayne Clements said...

Thank you!